Dr. Laura
Dr. Laura, America's #1 Relationship Talk Radio Host
On: SiriusXM Triumph Channel 111
Call 1-800-DR LAURA (1-800-375-2872) 11am - 2pm PT
Character-Courage-Conscience
08/14/2010
IconWhen was the last time that you really thought about the true meaning of what you were saying? If you have ever taken a foreign language, you may have heard from your instructor that English is one of the most difficult languages to learn because of all of the rules and exceptions, in addition to the many situations when there are no rules. More >>

Tags: Adult Child-ParentCharacter, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceFamily/Relationships - Adult Child/ParentFamily/Relationships - ChildrenFamily/Relationships - FamilyFamily/Relationships - TeensMorals, Ethics, ValuesMotherhoodMotherhood-FatherhoodParentingRelativesTeensValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/14/2010
IconIn terms of emotional oversimplification, children rarely learn to look below the surface of the most salient emotions to understand how emotions such as anger, sarcasm, or arrogance may be triggered by other emotions. More simply, they are not taught to do this. More >>

Tags: Adult Child-ParentCharacter, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceDr. E�Family/Relationships - Adult Child/ParentFamily/Relationships - ChildrenFamily/Relationships - FamilyFamily/Relationships - TeensMorals, Ethics, ValuesMotherhoodMotherhood-FatherhoodParentingRelativesTeensValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/14/2010
IconThere are lots of ways to be smart!  We need a range of abilities--analytical, creative, social & emotional, and practical--and the motivation to use them.  Yes, we are probably born with tendencies toward particular strengths and thinking styles in these areas, but all of them are affected by what we learn and experience. More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceMorals, Ethics, ValuesPersonal ResponsibilityValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/14/2010
IconHow often is that we see people in our extended families and our community that believe that their family gets along just fine and doesn't have any problems, only to find that screaming, yelling, name calling, and physical aggressiveness is almost the norm? More >>

Tags: Adult Child-ParentBehaviorCharacter, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceCivilityFamily/Relationships - Adult Child/ParentFamily/Relationships - ChildrenFamily/Relationships - FamilyFamily/Relationships - TeensMorals, Ethics, ValuesParentingRelativesTeensValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/13/2010
IconKeith McVey lives in Akron, Ohio. He's 53 years old and is a mailman. Everyone in Akron knows him. Recently, he saved the life of another person for the third time in his life.  While delivering the mail, he noticed a panicked man trying to revive his unconscious friend at the back of a pickup.  "He said his buddy wasn't breathing," explained McVey.  "I thought, well, let's see what's going on.  Sometimes you just have to act." More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/11/2010
IconI wanted to let you in on a little trick I do when I am feeling a bit overwhelmed with family stuff and day to day chores. More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceFamily/Relationships - FamilyRead On-AirRelativesValuesWomen's Point of View
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/10/2010
Icon.. I am gay... my partner and I have a business, and we necessarily hire young guys who are not real organized in their lives to work here... More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceDatingMen's Point of ViewRead On-AirResponse To A CommentValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
08/09/2010
IconMy mother, who shall we say loves to complain and make all problems revolve around her and focus on how they affect her, called me...Her dilemma - her ex-husband who is back together with her after leaving her for a 5 year shack up honey is back in her life. More >>

Tags: Adult Child-ParentCharacter, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceFamily/Relationships - Adult Child/ParentMorals, Ethics, ValuesRead On-AirValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
07/27/2010
Icon

The Future of Parenting
Five Key Trends in the Future of Parenting

By Caron B. Goode
www.acpi.com


The future is uncertain. So is the future of parenting. The aftermath of disasters such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina has cast a shadow of doubt over our lives. This pervasive sense of insecurity and vulnerability has prompted many people to reevaluate and reclaim what is most important to them#151;their families. We instinctively reach out to our families for comfort. But is it possible to give that feeling roots? Is it possible for parents to give their children a sense of strength, security, and faith in the future?

According to Caron B. Goode, director of the Academy for Coaching Parents International, it is not only possible, it is imperative.

Five Key Trends in the Future of Parenting
  • Family First. Although statistics indicate a 10% increase in the number of stay at home parents, the majority of children today are raised in families where both parents work. While economic pressures make this situation hard to escape, parents have begun to give voice to their desire to put family first. According to a 2004 study by the Families and Work Institute, parents are starting to say no to overtime and yes to family time. In fact, a recent survey found that among working fathers between the ages of 22-37, 52% have no interest in taking on more job responsibility, as compared to 68% in 1992.

  • Fostering Resiliency. While parents may have never considered fostering resiliency in their children before, they do now. Resiliency is the ability to navigate stressors, major or minor, and then return to the business of living. Studies have shown that children who have close, supportive families and caregivers are more apt to deal with stress or trauma in a positive manner than those who do not. Having supportive, sensitive, and responsible parents helps ensure that children are equipped to handle life's stressors, now and in the future.

  • Raising Compassionate Children. More and more, parents are concerning themselves with raising compassionate children. As borders blur and the global community expands, parents feel it is important for their children to be understanding, empathic, and willing to help a neighbor in need. To be compassionate, one must first be capable of identifying with another, which is best taught by example. Parents who treat their children with kindness and respect, will see those same children treating others in kind. By nature, children are caring and compassionate creatures, but it is up to parents to nurture their altruistic behavior.

  • Finding Faith. Increasingly, parents are becoming interested in helping their children develop a spiritual base. A growing number of parents are turning to spirituality, whether it is religious, iconic or mystic in nature, to help them navigate rough terrain and master the uncertainty that inevitably visits every life. Teaching children to believe in something greater than oneself fosters a sense of community and reinforces the tenets of tolerance on many levels. The very nature of spirituality shows children that no one person is more important than another. It illustrates that we are, in fact, all part of a greater whole, and that this whole can be a powerful source of strength and a vital instrument for change.

  • Reducing Stress. Today many adults and children suffer with chronic stress which has been linked to a number of physical conditions such as depression, heart disease, and diabetes. In addition to the adverse health consequences, overexposure to stress may, in part, inhibit the development of healthy resilience. Scientists believe that our ability to manage stress is formed in childhood through a combination of genes and experience. Everyone must learn to deal with stress, and to a degree stress is necessary to a healthy, productive life. This generation of families is aware of this fact, but they are also starting to say enough is enough. Mothers and fathers are beginning to recognize that they can't nor do they want to do it all. Parents are spending less time on the things they feel they must do, and making room for the things they want to do, like spend time with their family. They are starting to insist that their children assume responsibility within the family, which in turn is helping their children learn how to manage time, become part of a whole, and develop a strong sense of community. They are also starting to replace the propensity to over schedule their children and acknowledging that kids need time to be kids. This shift in attitude is leading to a less stressful existence, and is putting the emphasis back on the family functioning as a unit.
Dr. Caron Goode is a parenting expert and the director of the Academy of Parent Coaching International. The Academy offers a parent coaching certification program for individuals interested in helping families nurture and grow their children. For more information, visit www.acpi.biz Receive a free online parenting magazine, visit www.InspiredParenting.net. Permission granted for use on DrLaura.com.

More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceMarriageValuesWomen's Point of View
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
07/27/2010
Icon

"PASS OR FAIL"
Strengthen Your Marriage with a Simple Daily Exercise

By Winn Claybaugh
www.beniceorelse.com


I don't know about you, but I've found that on many days it's easier to smile at strangers than at the person at home. However, if you want a better marriage, then you need to practice every day with total strangers. Imagine that in the course of one day you come across fifty people. They might include strangers you pass in a parking lot, a waitress, or a bank teller. What if you looked at all of those relationships as a "pass or fail" exercise?

You pass when you smile at a stranger in the parking lot and say, "Have a nice day," or go out of your way to cheer a grumpy waitress, or choose to ignore a driver who flips you off. You fail when you come across that stranger in the parking lot and do absolutely nothing, or when that waitress has a worse day after her experience with you.

Can you have fifty fails in a day and expect to go home to a successful, constructive, loving relationship with your spouse? Absolutely not. You can't be a monster in the world and expect to be charming at home.

Several years ago, I traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, with a dear friend of mine, Kitty Victor, for a two-day seminar we were facilitating together. After landing at the airport, we had about an hour to grab our bags, get to the hotel, change clothes, and begin the seminar. We jumped into a cab but didn't tell the driver we were in a hurry. However, our cabbie was driving like a maniac and his driving began to frighten us. He darted in and out of lanes, honking and yelling at the other drivers. A driver next to us was talking on his cell phone, so our driver sped up, cut in front of the other driver, and slammed on his brakes-all in rush-hour traffic.

At that point I yelled, "What are you doing?" Our driver mumbled something about how he hated it when other drivers talk on the phone. I angrily quipped, "Oh, so you're going to teach him a lesson at the expense of our safety? Quit driving like a maniac! Slow down, and get us to our hotel safely."

At that point, Kitty asked me, "Pass or fail?"

I replied, "PASS!" Improving your relationships doesn't mean letting people walk all over you while you bite your tongue. Unconditional love doesn't mean unconditional abuse. Had I said nothing to the cab driver, I wouldn't have been honoring the most important relationship I have: my relationship with myself. Physically or verbally attacking him-"You're an idiot and the worst driver in history!"-would also be a fail.

If you want a better relationship with your spouse, you need to practice all day, every day, with total strangers. Every stranger you encounter was sent to you for a specific reason and purpose: They're your personal home-play assignments. So, which will it be-pass or fail?

Winn Claybaugh is the author of Be Nice (Or Else!) and "one of the best motivational speakers in the country," according to CNN's Larry King. A business owner for over 25 years with over 8,000 people in his organization, Winn is the co-owner of hair care giant Paul Mitchell's school division. Winn has helped thousands of businesses build their brands and create successful working cultures. His clients include Southwest Airlines, the Irvine Company, Vidal Sassoon, Entertainment Tonight, Mattel, For Rent magazine, Structure/Limited/Express, and others. Winn is a frequent guest on national radio and a regular contributor to online publications. Visit www.beniceorelse.com to sign up for his free monthly Be Nice (Or Else!) newsletter. Permission granted for use on DrLaura.com.

More >>

Tags: Character, Courage, ConscienceCharacter-Courage-ConscienceValues
PERMALINK | EMAIL | PRINT | RSS  Subscribe
Make an Appointment
Stay Connected
or connect at a place below
Normal Gear
Latest Poll
What's It Like To Be A New Mom? Better Or Worse Than You Expected?
Archives  |  Results
Programs
About Dr. Laura
Letters
E-mail of the Day
From Listeners
Audio & Video
YouTube Videos
Stay at Home
Parenting
Relationships
Simple Savings
Work at Home
Tip of the Week
Subscription
Membership
Help & Support
Family Premium Help Center
Podcast Help
Contact Us
Legal
Terms of Use
© 2019 DrLaura.com. Take on the Day, LLC
Dr. Laura is a registered trademark of Take On The Day, LLC.
Terms & Conditions  |  Privacy Policy
Powered By Nox Solutions